Price: $49.99 $99.99

OSHA HAZWOPER Certification

OSHA-40-Hour HAZWOPER

This beginner-level HAZWOPER course covers the OSHA Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response (HAZWOPER) regulations in just 40 hours of online training. The course fulfills the training requirements specified in OSHA regulations 29 CFR 1926.65 and 1910.120, which mandate that employees must undergo HAZWOPER training prior to beginning work at any uncontrolled hazardous waste company.

28 Modules

Workers are required to follow the OSHA 29 CFR 1910.120 requirements for hazardous waste operations and emergency response (HAZWOPER) while they are cleaning up, treating, storing, or disposing of hazardous chemicals as those terms are outlined in 49 CFR 171.8 and 40 CFR 261.3. There are major hazards associated with not understanding and adhering to these requirements, including the possibility of chemical burns, eye and skin irritation, and perhaps death. Our 40-hour HAZWOPER course assists employees, managers, as well as supervisors in achieving initial compliance to uphold a safe workplace and reduce health hazards.

You will receive a certificate of completion at the end of the course, which you can download right away. As evidence of your training, you may provide your employer with a certificate, and you can download photocopies at any time for your personal use. 

Who Needs Our OSHA-40-Hour HAZWOPER Training?


The majority of employees who are not familiar with emergency response procedures or uncontrolled hazardous waste must enroll in our 40-hour HAZWOPER training. This covers supervisors and management present on the job site, as well as general site employees like laborers and machinery operators.

Individuals who need this safety training are:

      General laborers

      Other general site workers

      Equipment operators

      On-site supervisory and management personnel

The 40-hour training is intended for those who are most at risk of exposure at work. Employees and managers who are not frequently on site are less likely to be subjected to the above allowable exposure limits, so just 24 hours of HAZWOPER training is appropriate. 


Course Modules - (28)

  • 1) What is HAZWOPER ?
  • 2) OSHA: 1910.120
  • 3) Hazardous waste operations and emergency response. - 1910.120
  • 4) Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response
  • 5) 1910.120(a) Scope, Application, and Definitions
  • 6) Key Provisions and Employer Requirements Under the HAZWOPER Standard
  • 7) Technical Enforcement and Assistance Guidelines for Hazardous Waste Site and RCRA Corrective Action Clean-up Operations
  • 8) Inspection Procedures for 29 CFR 1910.120 and 1926.65, Paragraph (q): Emergency Response to Hazardous Substance Releases
  • 9) National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences
  • 1) Introduction To OSHA ToolBox Talks
  • 2) Introduction to OSHA Regulation
  • 3) The OSHA Inspection Process
  • 4) Introduction to OSHA Directorate of Training and Education OSHA Training Institute
  • 5) How to Read OSHA Standard
  • 6) Workers’ Rights OSHA
  • 1) Hazard Communication Training
  • 2) The Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals
  • 3) HAZARD COMMUNICATION
  • 4) What is the NFPA 704 Fire Diamond?
  • 5) HMIS Hazard Rating System
  • 6) DOT Chart 16- Understanding HazMat Placards and Labels
  • 1) HAZWOPER Regulations
  • 2) RCRA
  • 3) Resource Conservation and Recovery Act
  • 4) The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act
  • 5) Environmental Law: The Clean Air Act
  • 6) Clean Water Act
  • 7) An Introduction to the Clean Water Act
  • 8) Understanding the Safe Drinking Water Act: Regulating Contaminants of Concern
  • 9) INTRODUCTION TO HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT. University of Alaska Fairbanks
  • 10) CERCLA
  • 11) CERCLA Superfund Act
  • 12) Introduction to CERCLA
  • 13) How a Superfund site gets cleaned up: Fletcher’s Paint Superfund Site Case Study
  • 14) HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS
  • 15) Brownfield Site
  • 16) Cradle to Grave
  • 17) Corrective Action
  • 1) EPA Radiation
  • 2) What is Radiation? What is Ionizing Radiation?
  • 3) The Electromagnetic Spectrum: Non-Ionizing Radiation
  • 4) Learn ionizing and non-ionizing Radiation in 3 minutes
  • 5) NON-IONIZING RADIATION (NIR) SAFETY MANUAL
  • 6) Biological Effects of Radiation
  • 7) The Harmful Effects of Ionising Radiation
  • 8) Radiation and Health: Go beyond the tiny world of the atom!
  • 9) What is a Dosimeter?
  • 1) HAZARD RECOGNITION
  • 2) Hazardous Materials
  • 3) Solubility Rules and How to Use a Solubility Table
  • 4) Physical vs Chemical Properties - Explained
  • 5) CHEMISTRY 101 - Chemical and physical properties and changes
  • 6) Corrosivity
  • 1) HAZARDS OF FLAMMABLE GASES, LIQUIDS & AEROSOLS & RISK MINIMIZATION
  • 2) Flashpoint, Flame point and Autoignition
  • 3) Explosive limits (LEL and UEL)
  • 4) BLEVE
  • 5) Combustible Dusts
  • 6) Flammable-Combustable Liquids
  • 7) Gases Physical Properties
  • 1) Introduction to Toxicology
  • 2) What Are Hazardous Materials?
  • 3) LD50
  • 4) Acute versus Chronic Toxicity
  • 5) Acute Vs Chronic
  • 1) TOXICOLOGY AND EXPOSURE GUIDELINES
  • 2) Ototoxicity & Ear Protection
  • 3) Preventing Hearing Loss Caused by Chemical (Ototoxicity) and Noise Exposure
  • 4) Toxicity and Hazard Exposure
  • 5) How the body takes up chemicals?
  • 6) The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Chemicals
  • 7) Routes of Hazardous Substance Entry
  • 1) Air Sampling Definitions
  • 2) Hands-on Activity Demonstration: Choosing an Occupational Exposure Limit
  • 3) IDLH | Wikipedia audio article
  • 4) Chemical Management and Permissible Exposure Limits (PELs)
  • 5) Permissible Exposure Limit “PEL.”
  • 1) Medical Surveillance Program
  • 2) Medical Screening and Surveillance Requirements in OSHA Standards: A Guide
  • 3) EXPOSURE MONITORING AND MEDICAL SURVEILLANCE
  • 4) Medical Surveillance Program
  • 5) Medical Surveillance Program Quick Reference Guide for Emergency Responders EPA
  • 6) Medical Examination Frequency
  • 1) Respiratory Protection Program Quick Reference Guide for Emergency Responders EPA
  • 2) Respiratory Protection. OSHA 29 CFR 1910.134
  • 3) Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) For Hazardous Materials Operations
  • 4) Supplied Air Respirators
  • 5) MSA SCBA Operations for Firefighters (Self Contained Breathing Apparatus)
  • 6) Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)
  • 7) RESPIRATORY PROTECTION PROGRAMS. EPA
  • 8) 3M™ Versaflo™ TR-300 Powered Air Purifying Respirator (PAPR)
  • 9) Identifying Hazard Control Options: The Hierarchy of Controls
  • 10) The Hierarchy of Controls
  • 1) Donning Level A & Level B DuPont™ Tychem® Encapsulated Suits
  • 2) Chemical Decontamination PPE: Level C 3M Breathe Easy - Doffing
  • 3) Behind the Swirl: Levels of PPE
  • 4) LEVELS OF PROTECTION AND CHEMICAL PROTECTIVE CLOTHING EPA
  • 5) HAZWOPER PPE Training
  • 6) PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT (PPE)
  • 7) PPE for Emergency Response and Recovery Workers
  • 1) Common components of site-specific safety plans
  • 2) Work Plan for Data Gap Sampling Mammoth Stamp Mill Site Inyo National Forest Mono County, California
  • 3) Site Safety and Health Plan
  • 4) HEALTH AND SAFETY PLAN "SAMPLE"
  • 5) SITE ENTRY AND RECONNAISSANCE EPA
  • 6) Training
  • 7) Training Program Elements
  • 8) Safety and Health Program
  • 9) SITE-SPECIFIC HEALTH AND SAFETY PLAN (SSHASP)
  • 10) HAZWOPER Policy
  • 11) Site Health & Safety Plan
  • 12) HAZWOPER Program Template
  • 1) Air Monitoring
  • 2) Basic Air Monitoring
  • 3) Photoionisation, how it works
  • 4) Monitoring and Sampling
  • 5) Personal Air Sampling
  • 6) AIR MONITORING INSTRUMENTS I EPA Monitors
  • 7) Air Monitoring
  • 8) Monitoring
  • 9) Air Monitoring
  • 1) Hazardous Materials Incident Response
  • 2) National Incident Management System (NIMS)
  • 3) INCIDENT COMMAND SYSTEMS OVERVIEW EPA
  • 4) Incident Command System overview
  • 1) Emergency Response Plan
  • 2) How to use the 2020 Emergency Response Guidebook
  • 3) Hazardous Materials for First Responders
  • 4) Initial Response to Hazardous Materials Incidents: Basic Concepts
  • 5) Hazardous Materials Incidents
  • 6) Emergency Response
  • 7) A CHECKLIST OF EMERGENCY RESPONSE ISSUES
  • 8) HAZWOPER Awareness Level Training
  • 9) HAZARDOUS WASTE OPERATIONS AND EMERGENCY RESPONSE - AWARENESS
  • 1) Hazardous Substances Emergency Events Surveillance, Nine States, 1999–2008
  • 2) National Incident Management System (NIMS)
  • 3) Assessment of Chemical Exposures: Epidemiologic Investigations After LargeScale Chemical Releases
  • 4) Collecting & Interpreting Hazard
  • 5) How to Sample Unknown Liquids
  • 1) Site Control Zones
  • 2) Work Practices and Site Control
  • 3) CONFINEMENT AND CONTAINMENT EPA
  • 4) Secondary Containment and Impracticability
  • 5) SPILL BOOMS
  • 6) SpillBully Absorbent Pillows Demonstration
  • 1) HAZWOPER Emergency Response Plan
  • 2) Operating Procedures, Safety Procedures & Training
  • 3) HAZARDOUS WASTE STORAGE CONTINGENCY PLAN & EMERGENCY PROCEDURES - MMC
  • 4) Emergency Response Planning for Hazardous Materials Safety Training Program
  • 1) site
  • 2) Site Characterization/Analysis
  • 1) Level A Decontamination Process
  • 2) Chemical Decontamination PPE: Level C 3M Breathe Easy - Doffing
  • 3) Decon Setup
  • 4) Hazardous Materials Decon
  • 5) AHC Fire Academy - HazMat DECON Operations
  • 6) EPA DECONTAMINATION
  • 7) On-Scene Gross Decontamination
  • 8) Decontamination
  • 1) Introduction to Confined Space
  • 2) Introduction to Permit Required Space
  • 3) Confined Space Construction
  • 4) Fatality in Confines Space
  • 5) Rescue Operations
  • 6) Confined Space Hazards Toxic Atmospheres
  • 7) Confined Space
  • 8) Atmospheric Testing
  • 9) Confined Space
  • 1) Plugging, Patching, and Overpacking
  • 2) Drum Handling, Storage, and Sampling Procedures
  • 3) Drum and Container Handling.
  • 4) GHS Drum Labeling Simplified
  • 5) Drum Staging
  • 6) Drum Inspection
  • 7) Drum Handling
  • 1) Occupational Exposure to Heat and Hot Environments
  • 2) 5 Tips for Protecting Employees from Heat Stress
  • 3) Working in The Cold
  • 4) Cold Stress
  • 1) Chain of Custody
  • 2) USDOT and OSHA HazCom Basic
  • 3) Overview of the Emergency Response Guidebook
  • 1) PPE for Emergency Response and Recovery Workers
  • 1) IS-700.B: An Introduction to the National Incident Management System
  • 2) IS-100.C: Introduction to the Incident Command System, ICS 100
  • 3) IS-0200.c Basic Incident Command System for Initial Response, ICS 200
  • 4) IS-0800.d: National Response Framework, An Introduction
  • 5) IS-706: NIMS Intrastate Mutual Aid - An Introduction
  • 6) IS-2200: Basic Emergency Operations Center Functions

Benefits of Our OSHA-40-Hour HAZWOPER Training


There’s a long list of benefits that one will have after completing this OSHA-40-Hour HAZWOPER training. Some of them are listed below.

       Thorough understanding of hazardous waste operations and emergency response.

       Adherence to OSHA guidelines guaranteeing a more secure workplace.

       Better response and preparedness for emergencies.

       A lower chance of injuries and accidents at work.

       Greater assurance and proficiency among workers managing hazardous materials.

So, what are you waiting for? Get enrolled in our OSHA-40-Hour HAZWOPER training today for a better and safer workplace environment!



course
Price: $49.99 $99.99

This Course Includes

  • Modules : 28
  • Duration : 40 Hours
  • Certificate : Yes
  • Language : English
  • Skill Level : Beginner
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